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20130115
20130123
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KQEH (PBS) 13
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English 13
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
? whole foods c.e.o. john mackey joins us. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." many american companies are gearing up to go public and investors are warming up to the idea of buying those shares. the success of the initial public offering of norwegian cruise lines on the nasdaq today could kick off a new wave of i.p.o.s. shares of the third largest cruise line operator in the u.s., skyrocketed more than 30%, from its $19 opening price. as erika miller reports, thanks to the bullish run in the stock market it could be full steam ahead for i.p.o.s. >> reporter: although 2012 was not exactly a banner year for initial public offerings, investment bankers expect things to improve this year. 8% of capital markets executives think there will be a substantial gain. 42% see a modest increase. but still one in five expect fewer companies to go public. this is according to a recent survey by consulting firm b.d.o. for i.p.o.s, much depends on what happens to the u.s. stock market. >> the i.p.o. market is very schizophrenic. the window for offerings opens and closes very quickly dependin
music, and she does not believe that i cannot. john williams said, of course he can read music. tavis: one of the things that i celebrate about you and revel in is your humanity. i revel in the humanity that is found in your lyrics. particularly when you jack -- juxtaposed that on the difficulty you have had in your own life. i am trying to find the right way to phrase it. how have those chapters help you in your riding, help you become who you are? >> my family suffers from addiction problems, as many do. also, i also i think some emotional problems, anxiety or depression. those are present in my family. sort of historically, as a matter of family history. it is not surprising that crops up in my generation a lot. it killed my brother alex, alcohol did. and substance abuse -- i was an active at it for a long time. it should have killed me about five times. really should have. i am very lucky to have survived it. there was a lot of wasted time, and there was a lot of unavailability, because i was just sealed off to the rest of the world. but somehow, i had to travel the route that i d
and grown and say that -- groan and say that obama is demeaning in the way he deals with house speaker john boehner. hold on, says columnist rockman. we expect too much of obama he says because in the united states, we subscribe to the quote, unquote myth of the imperial presidency. other transformational democratic presidents such as fdr and lbj, rockman says, have substantial democratic majorities in both the senate and in the house to enact their landmark legislation. obama in contrast has had to work with a narrow democratic majority in the senate and with an opposition party, the republicans in control of the house for the two years since january 2011. well, what about ronald reagan? president of the united states two successful four-year terms. on the domestic front, he enacted a major economic recovery package followed by an overhaul of social security. and in his second term, reagan gained a major tax reform. on the defense front, republican president reagan again with the help of the rity presided over a major increase in the defense budget, congress presided over a major increase
of the hopes and dreams of people across the country who knew can do better. i hope they recognize that john kerry and john edwards will be the team that can help us do better. >> how did you decide what to put in, what to leave out of your speech? i have been in a number of conversations this week center speech. people are trying to analyze what you did and did not say. i felt for you because it is unfortunate in many respects that if you win, you'll be the only african-american in the u.s. senate, you have to be all things to all people. how do you do a speech where you have to remain authentically black for those black folks in chicago and the south side who know you and at the same time, your the face of the party? -- you are the face the pot -- face of the party? >> i tried to remind people i am rooted in the african-american community but not bound by it. that applies to the speech and my politics. when i tried to pass a bill that is boosting the wages of low- wage workers, that helps everybody, but disproportionately, black folks are low wage. if i am working on people who are not ins
yesterday. >> i barack hussein obama swear -- >> supreme court justice john roberts swore in the first family. justice sotomayor did the honor at the vice president's residence at the united states naval observe tore in washington. >> and both families attended a church service at the episcopal church directly opposite the white house. moments ago the limousine carrying the obamas and the bidens arrived at the capital after the 12 block trip up pennsylvania avenue from the white house. >> joining us, our news hour regular column younist mark shields and new york sometimes columnist mark brooks. >> big day, gwen. it is a big day. it lacks the inherent drama and expense of the new first inaugural. this is important. i think it's a defining moment for the second inaugural, the president at the top of his popularity over the past three years and this is a chance to lay out what he wants to do, i think, in broad terms and specifically of course in the the state of the union. >> what do you say about the second inaugural? >> it's a ritual. there's a lot of celebrities in the crowd. i learned
. i could hear it. john blackwell, my drummer, his father taught him the same way. we learned from being shown. it does not come from books and reading. we need to be shown, you know. it is having really good teachers and a bar that is so high. tiger woods -- i could go on and on. tavis: you talked a couple of times about your father which you do not do in public and i appreciate you opening up in that way. tell me understand how -- i am trying to juxtaposed knowing you as i do, everything about you is love. you create love in the space you occupy. people feel the love. love is in york lyrical content. your whole life is about a love of humanity. i am trying to juxtaposed how you got to this place of being love when you had this relationship with your father that obviously did not always exhibit love. you could be a very mean personnel. why not? >> i have a mean side, yeah. tavis: let me back up then. >> i can go there. i am a fighter, i am very competitive. from him being so hard on me, the one thing i got out of it is dieter said that in his -- the one thing i got out of it is in
is whole foods holding up? we ask c.e.o. john mackey. and our friday "market monitor" guest says now is not the time to get too aggressive with your investments. he's glenmede investment's jason pride. >> susie: and monday on "n.b.r.," we take a special look at u.s. innovation. will america be able to keep its competitive edge, through new technologies and entrepreneurship? what better place to answer that question that at i.b.m.'s watson research center. bernie meyerson calls himself i.b.m.'s "chief geek," and leads the firm's efforts on innovation. >> innovation determines whether a large corporation, a small corporation, a startup or an entire society survive. it's that simple. the most direct attribute you can give to a thriving entity, i don't care what scale it is small, medium, large, enormous, is innovation. the reason is fundamentally to not only see the future, but to drive it. >> susie: join us monday for our look at u.s. innovation. it's our special martin luther king junior holiday edition. and, there's more to learn about innovation, on the "n.b.r." website. "nbr-u" has
to john boehner too many times his speakership could be in trouble. so my guess is it will come from the senate, but you've got zoe meeting quietly with a republican from florida talking about details they can bring back to their colleagues. i think actually this is one of these issues where people in both houses are going to want to take credit for being outfront on this issue. i think you're going to see a spate of bills coming forward. >> scott, this is a hot issue. lots of legislators as you mentioned are jumping on the bandwag bandwagon. the lawmakers you talked to in washington, how hopeful are they there will be a bipartisan deal reached this time around? immigration has been attempted before and it's failed. >> i think there is a lot of hope. as i said, the stars kind of are aligning on this, not only do you have republicans willing to come to the table and talk seriously about a major reform of immigration law, you've also got traditionally republican-leaning groups like agriculture. i talked to somebody from the western growers association this week who's really pressuring
this. at this moment they're trying to make their own deal with people like john mccain for next to nothing, from our point of view. you wouldn't see any of those four changes that we're pushing for. and i think he is reluctant, unfortunately, to go ahead with the overwhelming majority of democrats that he has. he has 51 democrats that would support senate resolution 4. and we need the american people to call in to senator reid and say, let's take a stand. let's bring democracy to the u.s. senate. >> the polls suggest that the majority of americans really want filibuster reform and want the talking filibuster back. >> right. overwhelming majority. two-thirds, at least. on the other side, 7 or 8 or 9% say, oh, yeah, they should be able to phone in from their fundrai fundraiser, and say, i object, and now you have unanimous consent, and to get out of unanimous consent, you need 60 votes to move forward. very few americans believed that's what they elected a senator to do. >> so a senator could be sitting somewhere off on capitol hill, raising money on the telephone which they all s
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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